STEAM

What is STEAM?

Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths - STEAM.

These are subjects we believe help students to widen their career options, and remove gender stereotyping when it comes to technical and non-traditional jobs. We want our students to feel passionate about STEAM subjects from an early age, so in 2017 we introduced the STEAM Year 9 Enrichment Programme. It's now in its second year, involving Year 9 and Year 10 students, who are building on their learnings from last year.

Year 9 students starting high school are able to join the programme, which includes a project-approach to coding, electronics, design technology and 3D modelling. Science and mathematics are also enriched with projects integrating these two disciplines.

"Our vision is to create a learning culture of curiosity in which students will engage in the world they are living in," says Susana Tomaz, Teacher in Charge of STEAM. "At puberty 50% of girls are petrified by fear of failure, with 80% of girls feeling societal pressure to be perfect. This leads to girls avoiding trying new things because they're afraid to fail. We create an environment where our students are able to grow and build confidence, while developing their skills in STEAM subjects."

If you would like to find out more about STEAM programme, please contact Susana on stomaz@westlakegirls.school.nz

STEAMing Ahead

Check out our first STEAM newsletter, released in April 2018.

STEAMing Ahead Newsletter Term 1 2018 

STEAM stuff

Waste management may not seem glamorous but it is definitely a big issue and one of interest to our STEAM students. In March we visited the Waitakere Refuse and Recycling Centre and students undertook the Zero Waste Zone programme. While doing a tour of the transfer station, students saw the tipping floor where all the orange plastic rubbish bags go before they are taken to the landfill. They had never seen so much rubbish. It was one morning’s worth. Students learnt about what different materials such as glass and plastic were made from. They also got to get up close with some tiger worms, aptly named for their big appetite, and examined how they helped with the decomposition process.  Back at school students will be working collaboratively to create video clips on how they would suggest we reduce waste and live more sustainably.